E Cigaret – Benefits And Controversies

After the discussion of e cigaret, there have been discussions throughout the world out of which majority concentrated on security of the cigarette. An elektronisk cigaret is into existence for several years and has been a good alternative to smoking conventional cigarettes. Not only is this but also an el cigaret helps smokers to lessen smoking.

Benefits of an ego cigaret:

An e cigaretter finds number of benefits associated with the electronic cigarettes, which are enumerated as under:

• Similar taste of conventional cigarettes: Electronic cigarettes contain similar tobacco taste but are free of other harmful substances being found in the conventional cigarettes. Electronic cigarettes allow smokers to remain satisfied without breathing in harmful toxins.

• User friendly: Fourth generation of an ego cigaret has become much user friendly than that of the initial versions that had been larger in size and could not encourage the mass.

• Creating smoke as vapor: An atomizer, a battery as well as an inexhaustible nicotine chamber allowing smokers to smoke, even create vapor and burn at end just like other traditional cigarettes.

• Reduced quantity of nicotine: Nicotine chamber in an elektronisk cigaret proves fruitful for smokers since the cartridges are being found in varied strengths, which permit users to lessen intaking, the quantity of nicotine.

• Saves on expenditure: Nicotine cartridges contain nearly 15 – 20 cigarettes that can be huge savings on your expenditure. Low, medium, standard or no nicotine contains different cartridge strengths.

• Environmental friendly: Smoking an e cigaret seems to be a healthier alternative to the conventional cigarettes as it is legalized to smoke in public places. For an instance: An e cigaretter needs to come out of public places such as pubs, restaurants, multiplex etc for smoking. However being eco-friendly, electronic cigarettes are being authorized to be used anywhere.

• Reusable: Smokers can make use of the electronic cigarettes, which means that only lesser quantity of vapor is required to be filled for every use.

• No smoke: One of the best things about an elektronisk cigaret is that it never produces smoke and are lesser risky to non-smokers and air quality. Owing to this reason, an ego cigaret is also referred to as smokeless cigarette.

Things to consider:

While there are so many benefits associated with an elektronisk cigaret, there are certain things that need to be considered prior to making the purchase. There are numerous groups pointing out the adverse effects of an ego cigaret. It came as a warning that children might get attracted towards the item given to its originality and alternative for varied flavorings. This is due to the fact that though most of the electronic cigarettes resemble conventional cigarettes yet others seem as USB sticks or pens.

There is not enough data stating the quantity of nicotine being used by a smoker and if it has severe effects. An e cigaret is much safer than conventional cigarettes, but it does not qualify them as extreme inhalation can leave dangerous effects on the body of smokers. Therefore, it is recommended to read the reviews clearly before purchasing the product.

Windows 7 Optimizer – Do You Really Need a Registry Optimizer For Windows 7?

A Windows 7 optimizer is not a luxury that you can avoid. Its a necessity given the vulnerability and the complexity involved in programming codes behind the operating system of this age. Why do you need a registry optimizer to clean your Windows 7? This question is propping up in minds of the rising users of the system ‘7’. There are some people who chose not to use a cleaner tool to fix their registry errors. The same is true for this version of the operating system. However, these people do realize at some later stage that their approach was not mindful

Not much time has passed since the launch of Windows 7 but people are starting to experience some errors such as reboot and restart problems, screen out issues and the windows slow speed performance while booting.

Although people do use antivirus and antispyware tools to protect their systems but they do forget one important thing which is the Windows 7 optimizer and cleaner utility. What happens is that people keep various infections away from their system but they don’t have idea that the spyware effect is left in the Windows 7 registry database. Similarly people do clean their systems from viruses and spywares but they don’t pay serious attention to clean the Windows 7 registry which results in the heavily messed up and corrupted registry entries getting accumulated in the registry database.

It is a proven fact that so much trash in the computer is the biggest cause of computer crashes and the decreased system speed. It is important, therefore, to clean registry as well. This can be done through a suitable registry optimizer and cleaner tool which can enhance computer speed function.

Thus using an Windows 7 optimizer is complimentary to other computer protection softwares. If you have already been using the security tools it is wise to add to your list the optimizer software. This will make a very good combination of software to protect your computer from all threats including the registry errors.

This approach has helped so many users to use their computers for long term without any PC crashes and hand problems.

Managing a Family With a Travel Nursing Career

A career as a travel nurse can be an exciting and rewarding opportunity to see the country. Travel nurses have the opportunity to see many places and people while earning a substantial income. Most travel nurse placements run for about 13 weeks which means relocating quite frequently. Fortunately, travel nurse agencies take into account that many nurses have families so they make arrangements to accommodate a nurse with a family.

A travel nursing career will give you more control over your work and life. Most travel nurse companies allow nurses to choose their assignments based on their personal needs. They tend to select assignments based on location, pay, benefits, professional opportunities, and accommodating their family. No matter where you choose to go in your travel nursing career, most agencies will provide you with nursing positions customized to your fit your lifestyle requirements. Most agencies will allow nurses to choose locations that are not too far from their home. The agencies will also assist nurses with finding accommodations with additional rooms for family members. Some may charge a small fee for the additional rooms. An agency may also help workers find a location in their local area with flexible shifts that will allow them to spend quality time with their family.

Some families will choose to accept a housing stipend instead of housing facilities and travel in a RV. They can then maintain a comfortable lifestyle with all of the necessities and supplies contained in the vehicle. Some families choose to home school their children. Most communities have a wealth of resources to assist in your home schooling needs. This often includes activities that will encourage active socialization activities for children. Married couples who are both travel nurses have the flexibility to arrange their work schedules so that someone is always at home with their children while the other one is on their travel nurse assignment. They will often alternate work placements. This will allow a couple to maintain a family unit as well as have work breaks. If home schooling is not an option, there are some work assignments that can last up to nine months so a child can attend a full school year. Others may choose to accept work assignments that are a few hours drive from their permanent home. With a little time management scheduling, one can earn a great living while raising a family.

Having children does not mean you cannot enjoy a successful career as a travel nurse. There are many advantages that can benefit you as well as your children. Many recruiting agencies will provide you with free housing. Another benefit of bringing your children on assignment is that they have the chance to see other parts of the country and people while you earn a great salary with great benefits. Most travel nursing pay scales are anywhere from ten to fifteen percent higher than the pay of a regular staff nurse. It is much like a working vacation.

The nursing shortage has health care facilities across the country seeking skilled professionals. Travel nurses are in great demand and travel nursing agencies are eager to recruit qualified workers to ease the workload. Finding the best and safest housing for you and your family is not a problem for most agencies. They will accommodate your extra needs, whether you require an extra room for the children or even extra needs for a pet. . As well, you will receive great compensation, great health care coverage, and other appealing incentives. If you are a travel nurse or are interested in a travel nurse career, it is a great time to acquire a position in a fast growing and popular health field.

Some Advantages Of A Nursing Career

A nursing career can be very rewarding. There are some definite advantages of choosing this particular career path. If you decide that this is the option to you than the first step to take will be to look at the requirements for the state in which you live. A general associates or bachelors degree will most likely be sufficient, but for certain specialties a more advanced degree may be necessary.

The different shift patterns that you will follow working as a nurse will certainly give you a lot of flexibility within the role. You will not be working a standard 9-to-5 because health care is something that is required at all times of the day and night. This means that you can really work shifts around your personal lifestyle and will have much more flexibility with the hours that you operate.

Of course, another of the major benefits associated with a nursing career is the fact that you will always have job security. Nurses are always going to be required, the matter what the state of the economy is in. While other parts of the workforce may become constricted, nurses are always going to be needed and therefore you should always be able to find work.

Most jobs within this field also come with a decent pay and benefits package. The pay is sufficient for any nurse to live a comfortable lifestyle and at the same time benefits will include a retirement plan, health insurance and other insurance coverage, and paid vacations.

Of course, one of the most obvious reasons for anyone to pursue this career path is because you will be helping people. Nurses generally have a maternal instinct and an instinct to help people, especially those in distress. Helping people get through their health problems certainly adds value to your own life.

Furthermore, if you have a passion for travel and you would like to experience some different places, cultures, and people, then you could become a travel nurse. As a travel nurse you will work different assignments in different areas around the country and the world, and there will be opportunities available in any specialty.

All in all, a nursing career provides a great deal of advantage and benefit to anyone who displays an unselfish nature. If you want to help people and, as a side product, get paid well for doing so, becoming a nurse would certainly be a good career choice.

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A Close Look at Top Reasons to Buy E-Cigarettes

The latest buzz on quit smoking products are electronic cigarettes or ecigs, as they are popularly called. An electronic cigarette is made up of two or three parts, consisting of a cartridge unit, an atomizer and a rechargeable battery. When the device is activated with the button, the nicotine cartridge is heated up by the heating unit to give off vapor that is inhaled. In automatic ecigs, you just have to inhale to activate the device.

Though there are many quit smoking products available, the most effective are e-cigarettes. They look like traditional cigarettes, feel like them, but they are better and cost less.

Here are lots of advantages in buying e-cigarettes. They are environment-friendly because they do not have any of the carcinogenic elements that are present on traditional cigarette smoke. The smoke from an ecig is vapor that quickly dissolves in the air, without toxins. You can beat the smoking ban with e-cigarettes because they can be used in public places where smoking is not allowed.

Ecigs do not contain tar or let out carbon monoxide and this removes the danger of second-hand smoke. As you drag on an e-cigarette, you get that real sense of satisfaction as that of smoking a traditional cigarette, but without letting toxins into your system.

E-cigarettes cost lesser than traditional cigarette and one cartridge is worth a couple of packs. An average smoker would be spending about $2000 or even more on cigarettes but you can save on all of this through e-cigs and this is one of the biggest advantages in buying e-cigarettes. Buying e-cigarettes saves you from problems like stained teeth, hands, finger, and breath, and smelly clothes. You don’t need an ashtray or a lighter to use them. E-cigarettes are easy to use because, you just have to press a button to activate them. The automatic ones can be started with mere inhalation.

If you find using an ecig starter pack to be expensive, check out a disposable electronic cigarette. Disposable e-cigarette types come with an atomizer, battery and a nicotine cartridge that usually lasts for about 12-20 traditional cigarettes. After the nicotine cartridge is completely used up, the cigarette has to be disposed and the device’s battery cannot be used again.

Economic Recession Blues – Hospitals Aren't an Exception

In its most recent update, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) announced that world growth is forecast to fall to its lowest level since World War II. And with the US being one of the worst hit, the hospital business, an integral part of the medical marketplace, and often regarded as recession proof is beginning to feel the heat.

Despite the fact that hospitals aren’t hit the way the way the automotive sector or the retail has been, and that people will continue to fall sick irrespective of the economy, it seems that the number of people seeking medical care and the profitability of hospitals don’t walk hand-in-hand.

Growth stunted & patients decreasing

A recent report by the American Hospital Association (AHA) finds that the sputtering economy has already led to 45% of hospitals to postpone forthcoming capital projects, with about 13% being forced to completely stall any expansion projects already underway. The AHA report included 639 hospitals in the study.

Further, experts believe that even though people continue to fall sick they’re postponing, most treatments if not all, which can be classified as elective. The credit for the prevailing scenario goes to all the layoffs and the slowing economy. As per the Bureau of Labor Statistics the month of December saw some of the worst layoff figures, as there were 2,275 mass layoff actions, involving 226,117 workers.

What seems worse is that aside from foregoing elective treatments, patients seem to be avoiding essential drugs, with many actually abusing prescription drugs, such as narcotic painkillers , sedatives and tranquilizers and stimulants.

As a consequence, hospitals are reeling under delayed hospital equipment and supply purchases, declining patient visits, reduced staff with no fresh hiring, unpaid medical bills, in addition to ceasing any construction projects. The AHA survey, released in November last year found that patient visits were static or had decreased during the third quarter of 2008, and the cases of unpaid medical bills for hospitals registered a hike of 8%.

The government’s role in uplifting the spirit of hospitals is being thought to be instrumental as Medicare and Medicaid account for about half of the hospital business industry.

Home Buyers and Sellers Real Estate Glossary

Every business has it’s jargon and residential real estate is no exception. Mark Nash author of 1001 Tips for Buying and Selling a Home shares commonly used terms with home buyers and sellers.

1031 exchange or Starker exchange: The delayed exchange of properties that qualifies for tax purposes as a tax-deferred exchange.

1099: The statement of income reported to the IRS for an independent contractor.

A/I: A contract that is pending with attorney and inspection contingencies.

Accompanied showings: Those showings where the listing agent must accompany an agent and his or her clients when viewing a listing.

Addendum: An addition to; a document.

Adjustable rate mortgage (ARM): A type of mortgage loan whose interest rate is tied to an economic index, which fluctuates with the market. Typical ARM periods are one, three, five, and seven years.

Agent: The licensed real estate salesperson or broker who represents buyers or sellers.

Annual percentage rate (APR): The total costs (interest rate, closing costs, fees, and so on) that are part of a borrower’s loan, expressed as a percentage rate of interest. The total costs are amortized over the term of the loan.

Application fees: Fees that mortgage companies charge buyers at the time of written application for a loan; for example, fees for running credit reports of borrowers, property appraisal fees, and lender-specific fees.

Appointments: Those times or time periods an agent shows properties to clients.

Appraisal: A document of opinion of property value at a specific point in time.

Appraised price (AP): The price the third-party relocation company offers (under most contracts) the seller for his or her property. Generally, the average of two or more independent appraisals.

“As-is”: A contract or offer clause stating that the seller will not repair or correct any problems with the property. Also used in listings and marketing materials.

Assumable mortgage: One in which the buyer agrees to fulfill the obligations of the existing loan agreement that the seller made with the lender. When assuming a mortgage, a buyer becomes personally liable for the payment of principal and interest. The original mortgagor should receive a written release from the liability when the buyer assumes the original mortgage.

Back on market (BOM): When a property or listing is placed back on the market after being removed from the market recently.

Back-up agent: A licensed agent who works with clients when their agent is unavailable.

Balloon mortgage: A type of mortgage that is generally paid over a short period of time, but is amortized over a longer period of time. The borrower typically pays a combination of principal and interest. At the end of the loan term, the entire unpaid balance must be repaid.

Back-up offer: When an offer is accepted contingent on the fall through or voiding of an accepted first offer on a property.

Bill of sale: Transfers title to personal property in a transaction.

Board of REALTORS® (local): An association of REALTORS® in a specific geographic area.

Broker: A state licensed individual who acts as the agent for the seller or buyer.

Broker of record: The person registered with his or her state licensing authority as the managing broker of a specific real estate sales office.

Broker’s market analysis (BMA): The real estate broker’s opinion of the expected final net sale price, determined after acquisition of the property by the third-party company.

Broker’s tour: A preset time and day when real estate sales agents can view listings by multiple brokerages in the market.

Buyer: The purchaser of a property.

Buyer agency: A real estate broker retained by the buyer who has a fiduciary duty to the buyer.

Buyer agent: The agent who shows the buyer’s property, negotiates the contract or offer for the buyer, and works with the buyer to close the transaction.

Carrying costs: Cost incurred to maintain a property (taxes, interest, insurance, utilities, and so on).

Closing: The end of a transaction process where the deed is delivered, documents are signed, and funds are dispersed.

CLUE (Comprehensive Loss Underwriting Exchange): The insurance industry’s national database that assigns individuals a risk score. CLUE also has an electronic file of a properties insurance history. These files are accessible by insurance companies nationally. These files could impact the ability to sell property as they might contain information that a prospective buyer might find objectionable, and in some cases not even insurable.

Commission: The compensation paid to the listing brokerage by the seller for selling the property. A buyer may also be required to pay a commission to his or her agent.

Commission split: The percentage split of commission compen-sation between the real estate sales brokerage and the real estate sales agent or broker.

Competitive Market Analysis (CMA): The analysis used to provide market information to the seller and assist the real estate broker in securing the listing.

Condominium association: An association of all owners in a condominium.

Condominium budget: A financial forecast and report of a condominium association’s expenses and savings.

Condominium by-laws: Rules passed by the condominium association used in administration of the condominium property.

Condominium declarations: A document that legally establishes a condominium.

Condominium right of first refusal: A person or an association that has the first opportunity to purchase condominium real estate when it becomes available or the right to meet any other offer.

Condominium rules and regulation: Rules of a condominium association by which owners agree to abide.

Contingency: A provision in a contract requiring certain acts to be completed before the contract is binding.

Continue to show: When a property is under contract with contingencies, but the seller requests that the property continue to be shown to prospective buyers until contingencies are released.

Contract for deed: A sales contract in which the buyer takes possession of the property but the seller holds title until the loan is paid. Also known as an installment sale contract.

Conventional mortgage: A type of mortgage that has certain limitations placed on it to meet secondary market guidelines. Mortgage companies, banks, and savings and loans underwrite conventional mortgages.

Cooperating commission: A commission offered to the buyer’s agent brokerage for bringing a buyer to the selling brokerage’s listing.

Cooperative (Co-op): Where the shareholders of the corporation are the inhabitants of the building. Each shareholder has the right to lease a specific unit. The difference between a co-op and a condo is in a co-op, one owns shares in a corporation; in a condo one owns the unit fee simple.

Counteroffer: The response to an offer or a bid by the seller or buyer after the original offer or bid.

Credit report: Includes all of the history for a borrower’s credit accounts, outstanding debts, and payment timelines on past or current debts.

Credit score: A score assigned to a borrower’s credit report based on information contained therein.

Curb appeal: The visual impact a property projects from the street.

Days on market: The number of days a property has been on the market.

Decree: A judgment of the court that sets out the agreements and rights of the parties.

Disclosures: Federal, state, county, and local requirements of disclosure that the seller provides and the buyer acknowledges.

Divorce: The legal separation of a husband and wife effected by a court decree that totally dissolves the marriage relationship.

DOM: Days on market.

Down payment: The amount of cash put toward a purchase by the borrower.

Drive-by: When a buyer or seller agent or broker drives by a property listing or potential li
sting.

Dual agent: A state-licensed individual who represents the seller and the buyer in a single transaction.

Earnest money deposit: The money given to the seller at the time the offer is made as a sign of the buyer’s good faith.

Escrow account for real estate taxes and insurance: An account into which borrowers pay monthly prorations for real estate taxes and property insurance.

Exclusions: Fixtures or personal property that are excluded from the contract or offer to purchase.

Expired (listing): A property listing that has expired per the terms of the listing agreement.

Fax rider: A document that treats facsimile transmission as the same legal effect as the original document.

Feedback: The real estate sales agent and/or his or her client’s reaction to a listing or property. Requested by the listing agent.

Fee simple: A form of property ownership where the owner has the right to use and dispose of property at will.

FHA (Federal Housing Administration) Loan Guarantee: A guarantee by the FHA that a percentage of a loan will be underwritten by a mortgage company or banker.

Fixture: Personal property that has become part of the property through permanent attachment.

Flat fee: A predetermined amount of compensation received or paid for a specific service in a real estate transaction.

For sale by owner (FSBO): A property that is for sale by the owner of the property.

Gift letter: A letter to a lender stating that a gift of cash has been made to the buyer(s) and that the person gifting the cash to the buyer is not expecting the gift to be repaid. The exact wording of the gift letter should be requested of the lender.

Good faith estimate: Under the Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act, within three days of an application submission, lenders are required to provide in writing to potential borrowers a good faith estimate of closing costs.

Gross sale price: The sale price before any concessions.

Hazard insurance: Insurance that covers losses to real estate from damages that might affect its value.

Homeowner’s insurance: Coverage that includes personal liability and theft insurance in addition to hazard insurance.

HUD/RESPA (Housing and Urban Development/Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act): A document and statement that details all of the monies paid out and received at a real estate property closing.

Hybrid adjustable rate: Offers a fixed rate the first 5 years and then adjusts annually for the next 25 years.

IDX (Internet Data Exchange): Allows real estate brokers to advertise each other’s listings posted to listing databases such as the multiple listing service.

Inclusions: Fixtures or personal property that are included in a contract or offer to purchase.

Independent contractor: A real estate sales agent who conducts real estate business through a broker. This agent does not receive salary or benefits from the broker.

Inspection rider: Rider to purchase agreement between third party relocation company and buyer of transferee’s property stating that property is being sold “as is.” All inspection reports conducted by the third party company are disclosed to the buyer and it is the buyer’s duty to do his/her own inspections and tests.

Installment land contract: A contract in which the buyer takes possession of the property while the seller retains the title to the property until the loan is paid.

Interest rate float: The borrower decides to delay locking their interest rate on their loan. They can float their rate in expectation of the rate moving down. At the end of the float period they must lock a rate.

Interest rate lock: When the borrower and lender agree to lock a rate on loan. Can have terms and conditions attached to the lock.

List date: Actual date the property was listed with the current broker.

List price: The price of a property through a listing agreement.

Listing: Brokers written agreement to represent a seller and their property. Agents refer to their inventory of agreements with sellers as listings.

Listing agent: The real estate sales agent that is representing the sellers and their property, through a listing agreement.

Listing agreement: A document that establishes the real estate agent’s agreement with the sellers to represent their property in the market.

Listing appointment: The time when a real estate sales agent meets with potential clients selling a property to secure a listing agreement.

Listing exclusion: A clause included in the listing agreement when the seller (transferee) lists his or her property with a broker.

Loan: An amount of money that is lent to a borrower who agrees to repay the amount plus interest.

Loan application: A document that buyers who are requesting a loan fill out and submit to their lender.

Loan closing costs: The costs a lender charges to close a borrower’s loan. These costs vary from lender to lender and from market to market.

Loan commitment: A written document telling the borrowers that the mortgage company has agreed to lend them a specific amount of money at a specific interest rate for a specific period of time. The loan commitment may also contain conditions upon which the loan commitment is based.

Loan package: The group of mortgage documents that the borrower’s lender sends to the closing or escrow.

Loan processor: An administrative individual who is assigned to check, verify, and assemble all of the documents and the buyer’s funds and the borrower’s loan for closing.

Loan underwriter: One who underwrites a loan for another. Some lenders have investors underwrite a buyer’s loan.

Lockbox: A tool that allows secure storage of property keys on the premises for agent use. A combo uses a rotating dial to gain access with a combination; a Supra® (electronic lockbox or ELB) features a keypad.

Managing broker: A person licensed by the state as a broker who is also the broker of record for a real estate sales office. This person manages the daily operations of a real estate sales office.

Marketing period: The period of time in which the transferee may market his or her property (typically 45, 60, or 90 days), as directed by the third-party company’s contract with the employer.

Mortgage banker: One who lends the bank’s funds to borrowers and brings lenders and borrowers together.

Mortgage broker: A business that or an individual who unites lenders and borrowers and processes mortgage applications.

Mortgage loan servicing company: A company that collects monthly mortgage payments from borrowers.

Multiple listing service (MLS): A service that compiles available properties for sale by member brokers.

Multiple offers: More than one buyers broker present an offer on one property where the offers are negotiated at the same time.

National Association of REALTORS® (NAR): A national association comprised of real estate sales agents.

Net sales price: Gross sales price less concessions to the buyers.

Off market: A property listing that has been removed from the sale inventory in a market. A property can be temporarily or permanently off market.

Offer to purchase: When a buyer proposes certain terms and presents these terms to the seller.

Office tour/caravan: A walking or driving tour by a real estate sales office of listings represented by agents in the office. Usually held on a set day and time.

Parcel identification number (PIN): A taxing authority’s tracking number for a property.

Pending: A real estate contract that has been accepted on a property but the transaction has not closed.

Personal assistant: A real estate sales agent administrative assistant.

Planned unit development (PUD): Mixed-use development that sets aside areas for residential use, commercial use, and public areas such as schools, parks, and so on.

Preapproval: A higher level of buyer/borrower prequalification required by a mortgage lender. Some preapprovals have conditions the borrowe
r must meet.

Prepaid interest: Funds paid by the borrower at closing based on the number of days left in the month of closing.

Prepayment penalty: A fine imposed on the borrower by the lender when the loan is paid off before it comes due.

Prequalification: The mortgage company tells a buyer in advance of the formal mortgage application, how much money the borrower can afford to borrow. Some prequalifications have conditions that the borrower must meet.

Preview appointment: When a buyer’s agent views a property alone to see if it meets his or her buyer’s needs.

Pricing: When the potential seller’s agent goes to the potential listing property to view it for marketing and pricing purposes.

Principal: The amount of money a buyer borrows.

Principal, interest, taxes, and insurance (PITI): The four parts that make up a borrower’s monthly mortgage payment. Private mortgage insurance (PMI): A special insurance paid by a borrower in monthly installments, typically of loans of more than 80 percent of the value of the property.

Professional designation: Additional nonlicensed real estate education completed by a real estate professional.

Professional regulation: A state licensing authority that oversees and disciplines licensees.

Promissory note: A promise-to-pay document used with a contract or an offer to purchase.

R & I: Estimated and actual repair and improvement costs.

Real estate agent: An individual who is licensed by the state and who acts on behalf of his or her client, the buyer or seller. The real estate agent who does not have a broker’s license must work for a licensed broker.

Real estate contract: A binding agreement between buyer and seller. It consists of an offer and an acceptance as well as consideration (i.e., money).

REALTOR®: A registered trademark of the National Association of REALTORS® that can be used only by its members.

Release deed: A written document stating that a seller or buyer has satisfied his or her obligation on a debt. This document is usually recorded.

Relist: Property that was listed with another broker but relisted with a current broker.

Rider: A separate document that is attached to a document in some way. This is done so that an entire document does not need to be rewritten.

Salaried agent: A real estate sales agent or broker who receives all or part of his or her compensation in real estate sales in the form of a salary.

Sale price: The price paid for a listing or property.

Seller (owner): The owner of a property who has signed a listing agreement or a potential listing agreement.

Showing: When a listing is shown to prospective buyers or the buyer’s agent (preview).

Special assessment: A special and additional charge to a unit in a condominium or cooperative. Also a special real estate tax for improvements that benefit a property.

State Association of REALTORS®: An association of REALTORS® in a specific state.

Supra®: An electronic lockbox (ELB) that holds keys to a property. The user must have a Supra keypad to use the lockbox.

Temporarily off market (TOM): A listed property that is taken off the market due to illness, travel, needed repairs, and so on.

Temporary housing: Housing a transferee occupies until permanent housing is selected or becomes available.

Transaction: The real estate process from offer to closing or escrow.

Transaction management fee (TMF): A fee charged by listing brokers to the seller as part of the listing agreement.

Transaction sides: The two sides of a transaction, sellers and buyers. The term used to record the number of transactions in which a real estate sales agent or broker was involved during a specific period.

24-hour notice: Allowed by law, tenants must be informed of showing 24 hours before you arrive.

Under contract: A property that has an accepted real estate contract between seller and buyer.

VA (Veterans Administration) Loan Guarantee: A guarantee on a mortgage amount backed by the Department of Veterans Affairs.

Virtual tour: An Internet web/cd-rom-based video presentation of a property.

VOW’s (Virtual Office web sites): An Internet based real estate brokerage business model that works with real estate consumers in same way as a brick and mortar real estate brokerage.

W-2: The Internal Revenue form issued by employer to employee to reflect compensation and deductions to compensation.

W-9: The Internal Revenue form requesting taxpayer identification number and certification.

Walk-through: A showing before closing or escrow that permits the buyers one final tour of the property they are purchasing.

Will: A document by which a person disposes of his or her property after death.

Age Appropriate and Attractive Ideas For Aging Gracefully

Maturity is a badge of honor to be respected with good taste. There simply comes a time when all the extra bling and fabulousness of fashion, hair and makeup is best toned down. When you were a younger Alluring, Innovative or Dramatic woman, those items of “look at me, I’m au currant” stood for something. Status, hipness, a woman in the moment who’s up on the trend. But wisdom carries with it a confidence and sophistication that allows you to do less and achieve more. A maturing face and figure carries a patina of wisdom. A statement in and of itself, it doesn’t require bright lips, over the top earrings or a crazy hip belt to bring it forward. It stands there, gently making its own beautiful statement. Less is simply more as we age. To accentuate your second act best:

o    Avoid drawing attention to your mouth with bright or dark lips.
o    Avoid drawing attention to aging eyelids with frosted shadow.
o    Avoid drawing attention to aging hands with bright nail polish and/or a multitude of attention-grabbing rings.
o    Draw the eye to your face with neckline interest and earrings.
o    When in doubt leave it out.

The Importance of Being Current 

Keeping current is undoubtedly a constant and not inexpensive challenge. With all the technology with which we are bombarded, however, we still have the old standby; the monthly magazine. Magazine subscriptions are one of the most effective ways of getting information you can absorb on your downtime. The whole experience of sitting down with and perusing a magazine that inspires is a ritual that endures. Magazines are the great equalizer. No matter where you live in the country you have the same access to fashion, fitness and beauty that the most upscale, in-the-know New York socialite has, because she gets her “W” magazine the same time you do. When “O” comes out, you’re right there with all of Oprah’s associates on the hottest, latest and most suitable fashion, food, fun and inspiration you need that month. You just go to your mailbox, Oprah is waiting for you, and it’s your turn to dream. 

What Were We Thinking?

We’ve all done it. Looked back at those embarrassing fashion photos and wondered, “What was I thinking?” I look back at my pinstriped jeans, permed hair and parachute pants and think “Hmmmm.” The more extreme trend, the more risk of later embarrassment. We may forgive the young. But it’s not so easy to forgive a second actor in a leather mini.

A woman in Act Two need never wear:

1.     A micro mini
2.     Combat boots with formal wear
3.     White hose
4.     Frosted eye shadow
5.     Chunky platforms
6.     Dark brown lipstick
7.     Butterfly barrettes
8.     Extreme low-rise jeans
9.     Visible underwear
10.   A spiral perm

What’s Age Appropriate Now?

In our Second Act it becomes difficult to find the balance between matronly and modern. Looking current and youthful should not translate into “mutton dressed as lamb.” I met a woman recently whose long, blonde, permed hair was pulled up on one side and suspended with a comb. For height she created gravity defying bangs with a curling iron and “Spritz Forte.” She wore a fitted navy knit tank, tight tapered pale denim jeans and a crocheted sparkly baby blue shawl tied around her hips. She was 48. 

I liked her and enjoyed hearing her tales of woe in raising teenagers. But as I listened I was continually distracted by her image. It just wasn’t working in her favor. The reason it didn’t work was because it was expressing only a part of this woman. I obviously knew who she had been, but as she talked, the more interesting experienced and attractive parts were hidden behind a façade of fear of aging. Yes, she was attractive and sexy but she was also a 48-year-old single mother of teenagers who had quite a bit of sun damage, an advancing derriere, tan lines across her back and thinning hair. The look did not make her look younger; it made her look vulnerable and insecure. Our image must reflect who we’ve become, not who we were. That is age appropriate. 

Car Rental Rates – How to Get the Best Car Rental Rates

Car rental rates are obviously dependent on which dealership you opt for and how long you need the vehicle for. To get the best car rental rates you must be certain of the period in which you are going to require the vehicle for. For example, you would not want to rent a car for 3 days, to find out you need it for an additional 3 days this is where dealerships will charge for days the vehicle is required for, at their daily rate; savings are to be made when you book for a week if there is any chance of requiring the vehicle for longer. Agencies operate on weekly and daily rates; it always pays to look into the weekly rate as this is usually lower than a per day rate.

If you want to find the best car rental rates you must shop around. Car rental rates are constantly changing due to supply and demand and obviously change in line with the season. You will need to book far in advance should you want a rental car over any holiday period. Make sure you enquire about special holiday rates as some rental agents will give away a day extra for free over these periods. Make sure you are certain of you required dates over these periods as agencies cancellations over these periods will incur large fees.

To find the best car rental rates when it comes to long distance trips, it pays to book well in advance and ask your travel agent of any deals that are not publicly advertised. If you are planning a road trip to Las Vegas for tonight, you’ll have wanted to have booked at least a week ago to get the best rates and avoid disappointment. Remember that reservation only guarantees a reserved rate, you must specify if you are after a specific vehicle.

If you think the weekend car rental rates you are getting are too good to be true, then they probably are. You will want to ask for any hidden costs, such as insurance, state taxes, varying fees for drivers of different ages and refueling charges. Ask your rental agent of any compulsory insurance fees, as these hidden costs are generally what makes the advertised costs so well, read the disclaimer! Some states in America give rental car agents permission to charge extra fees on their rentals to cover the costs of licensing their cars. This is fee is generally 6% of the total rental costs. The majority of states in America do not require rental agents to inform the customer of this fee, so make sure you ask before hiring.

To get the cheapest, most value for money rental car rates you will need to shop around, be sure of the duration you require the vehicle for, make sure you ask about any hidden fees and always book well in advance.